22 October-The Great Disappointment (End Of The World)

William Miller was a Baptist preacher who was a native of the United States. He believed that the Earth’s destruction by fire at Christ’s Second Coming would occur sometime in 1843/1844. In 1822 he wrote: ‘I believe that the second coming of Jesus Christ is near, even at the door, even within twenty-one years,—on or before 1843’.

Miller spent years studying the Bible and particularly the prophecies of Daniel. His studies led him to predict that the Second Coming of Jesus would occur on October 22nd 1844. The day came and went and the world didn’t end as William Miller had predicted. It became known as the Great Disappointment and led to the formation of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church.

The Great Disappointment occurred when the world didn’t end as predicted by Baptist preacher William Miller in the year 1844 On This Day.

Seventh Day Adventist Church Chichester Road

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21 October-Asperger Syndrome

Hans Asperger, after whom Asperger Syndrome is named was a native of Austria. He was a medical professor, paediatrician and child psychologist who is reported to have studied more than 400 children. He published the first definition of Asperger Syndrome in 1944. Because of the children’s ability to talk in great detail about their favourite subject, Asperger referred to them as ‘little professors’.

Hans Asperger was born Johann Friedrich Karl Asperger in Vienna on February 18th 1906. He studied medicine at the University of Vienna and was awarded a medical degree in 1931. In 1944 he published a definition of autistic psychopathy. He outlined a pattern of behaviour and abilities which included: ‘lack of empathy, little ability to form friendships, one-sided conversations, intense absorption in a special interest, and clumsy movements’. His studies did not attract worldwide attention until after his death.

Hans Asperger, after whom Asperger Syndrome is named, died aged 74 in Vienna, Austria in the year 1980 On This Day.

Autism Awarness Ribbon

 

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20 October-Jack Lynch

Jack Lynch was a sportsman and politician who served two terms as Taoiseach of Ireland from 1966 to 1973 and 1977 to 1979. Prior to entering politics Lynch had a successful sporting career in Gaelic Games. He won All-Ireland medals in both Hurling and football.

Jack Lynch was born John Mary Lynch in Cork City Ireland on August 15th 1917. He was educated locally and having studied law was called to the bar in 1945. On the sports field Lynch won five All-Ireland hurling medals with Cork (1941-4 and 1946). He won an All-Ireland football medal with cork in 1945.

The Fianna Fáil political party asked Jack Lynch to stand as a candidate in the General Election of 1948. He was elected as TD for the Cork Borough constituency. He was returned to Dáil Éireann for the constituency at each subsequent election until his retirement in 1981.

Jack Lynch served in several ministries before being elected Taoiseach in 1966. As Taoiseach he had to deal with the outbreak of civil unrest and the collapse of the Government of Northern Ireland. In 1970 he dismissed two cabinet members during the Arms Crisis. Lynch developed the idea of a power sharing administration between Unionists and Nationalists as a solution to the Northern Ireland problem.

In 1973 Jack Lynch signed the EEC accession treaty. He was defeated in the General Election which followed and went into opposition for four years. He was returned as Taoiseach in the General Election of 1977 but resigned in 1979. He retired from politics in 1981.

Jack Lynch died at the age of 82 in the year 1999 On This Day.

Department of Taoiseach by Nico Kaiser on 2012-10-22 14:04:54

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19 October-Luther

Martin Luther was a Roman Catholic theologian and Augustinian Friar who began the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. The publication of his 95 theses on October 31st 1517 called into question some of practices then in vogue in the Catholic Church. The Theses and other writings gained numerous followers who split from the Catholic Church.

Martin Luther was born in Eisleben in present day Germany on November 10th 1483. Having joined the Augustinian Order he was ordained a priest in 1507. He began teaching at the University of Wittenberg and was made a Doctor of Theology in 1512. He visited Rome in 1510 where some of the corrupt practices he witnessed there, led him to publish his Theses.

He was excommunicated by Pope Leo X in 1521 and declared a heretic and outlaw by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. His writings however became popular across northern and eastern Europe. Luther made the bible accessible to the laity by translating it into the German language. He made strong written attacks on people of the Jewish faith saying their homes should be destroyed and their liberty curtailed. Luther married a former nun with whom he had six children. He died on February 18th 1546 at the age of 62.

Martin Luther, a Roman Catholic priest who began the Protestant Reformation in 16th-century Europe, was made a Doctor of Theology (Doctor in Biblia) in the year 1512 On This Day.

Luther

 

 

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17 October-Marconi

Guglielmo Marconi was a Nobel Prize-winning physicist who was a native of Italy. His father Giuseppe was from Bologna, Italy. His mother was Annie Jameson from Daphne Castle, Co Wexford, Ireland. Marconi’s great grandfather was John Jameson, founder of Irish whiskey distillers Jameson & Sons. Through his own research and using research carried out by others Marconi developed the first effective system of radio communication.

On December 12th 1901 Marconi succeeded in sending the first wireless signal across the Atlantic to America. He routed the signal through Marconi House, Rosslare, Co Wexford and Clifden in Co Galway. The signal was received 3,500km (2,200 Miles) in Newfoundland.

Marconi founded the Marconi Telephone Company and became a successful businessman. He continued to experiment with radio technology. In 1907, having built high-powered radio transmission stations on both sides of the Atlantic, he established regular transatlantic transmissions. Marconi died in Rome on July 20th 1937.

Guglielmo Marconi began offering limited commercial wireless telegraph service between Ireland and Nova Scotia in the year 1907 On This Day.

Marconi Wireless Telegraph Station, Malin Head, Co. Donegal

Guglielmo Marconi.jpg

Marconi

Library of Congress 

 

 

 

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