17 December-Dublin to Dún Laoghaire Railway

William Dargan, an engineer, from Killeshin near Carlow town, Ireland completed the building of Ireland’s first railway line in 1834. The line, which is 10km long ran from Westland Row station (now Dublin Pearse) in Dublin city to Kingstown (now Dún Laoghaire). It was the first suburban and commuter railway line in the world and continues to operate to the present day.

In 1825 the Stockton and Darlington Railway in England had proved successful for the colliery owners and encouraged investment in the railways. In the same year an attempt to build a railway from Dublin to Kingstown failed to get approval. A year later in 1826 a railway line between Waterford and Limerick was authorised. However work on the line did not commence until 1848, by which time trains had been running on the line from Dublin to Kingstown for over a decade.

The company which would build the Dublin to Kingstown railway was founded in 1831. Following the passing of the necessary parliamentary act the contract to build the railway line was awarded to William Dargan. William Dargan was born near Carlow town on February 28th 1799. In his early career he built roads in England and Ireland most notably the road from Dublin to Howth. Following the successful completion of the first railway line in Ireland, Dargan went on to build over 1,300km of Ireland’s railways. He is often referred to as the father of the Irish rail network. He was also responsible for a host of other infrastructure projects around Ireland and he funded the Great Industrial Exhibition in Dublin in 1853.

Construction on the new railway line began on April 11th 1833. Several engineering difficulties and opposition from some landowners along the route had to be overcome. Up to 1,800 people were employed when building was at its peak. It was built within the agreed budget and on time. The first journey was made by horse drawn coach, when one of the lines was complete. The journey was made in July 1834 by directors of the company and their friends.

Though the new service was resented by many, over 300,000 passengers used it in the first six months when it began service in 1834. Trains ran every half hour from 6am until midnight. It was later decided to extend the railway southwards. Isambard Brunel was appointed as consulting engineer for the line to Greystones. The railway line eventually reached Wexford in 1872. The first trial run of a train from Dublin to Kingstown consisted of eight carriages hauled by a steam locomotive. Described as being ‘filled with ladies and gentlemen’ the trial run took place on October 9th 1834.

Ireland’s first railway from Dublin (Dublin Pearse) to Kingstown (Dún Laoghaire) was officially opened in the year 1834 On This Day.

Dun Laoghaire by infomatique on 2009-08-02 14:25:14

 

23 July-St Vincents Hospital

St. Vincent’s Hospital is located at Elm Park on the south side of Dublin City, Ireland. Founded in 1834 by Mother Mary Aikenhead of the Religious Sisters of Charity, it was renamed St. Vincent’s University Hospital in 1999. It is a major teaching hospital and a principal teaching hospital of University College Dublin.

St. Vincent’s Hospital was first established at 56 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin in 1834. The hospital expanded rapidly, becoming a training school for nurses and doctors. In 1852 Florence Nightingale visited St Vincent’s to observe the work of the Sisters of Charity. The hospital moved to Elm Park in 1970 and today it is a major academic teaching hospital.

St. Vincent’s Hospital, a major teaching hospital and a principal teaching hospital of University College Dublin, was established in the year 1834 On This Day.

Hospital main entrance

St Vincents Hospital, Main Entrance

Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

 

 

 

08 April-Jonah Barrington

Jonah Barrington was a native of Co Laois, Ireland. He was a Judge and a Member of the Parliament of Ireland in Dublin until it’s dissolution in 1800. He was opposed to, and voted against the Act of Union. His publications include ‘Historic Memoirs of Ireland’ and ‘The Rise and Fall of the Irish Nation’

Jonah Barrington was born in the townland of Knapton near the town of Abbeyleix, Co Laois in 1757. He was the fourth child of a family of a reported sixteen children. In 1773 he entered Trinity College Dublin but left without being awarded a degree. Barrington was a member of the Irish Volunteers. He supported the Irish Patriot Party which succeeded in gaining legislative independence for Ireland in 1782.

In 1798 Barrington was appointed an Admiralty court judge. He was awarded a knighthood in 1807 but moved to France in 1815 to escape his creditors. In 1830 he became the only judge ever to be removed from his post by both houses of Parliament. His removal from office was a consequence of his misappropriation of public monies.

Jonah Barrington, a native of Co Laois, Ireland, who was a Judge and a Member of the Parliament of Ireland in Dublin until it’s dissolution in 1800, died in Versailles, France in the year 1834 On This Day.

Image taken from page 8 of ‘[Historic Memoirs of Ireland

File:Jonah Barrington.JPG

Jonah Barrington (Wikimedia Commons)

 

 

 

 

 

 

09 October-Ireland’s first Railway

Ireland’s first railway was 10km long and ran from Westland Row station (now Dublin Pearse) in Dublin city to Kingstown (now Dún Laoghaire). It was the first suburban and commuter railway line in the world. The railway, which began operations in 1834 continues to operate to the present day.

In 1825 the Stockton and Darlington Railway in England had proved successful for the colliery owners. The success encouraged investment in the railways. In the same year an attempt to build a railway from Dublin to Kingstown failed to get approval. A year later in 1826 a railway line between Waterford and Limerick was authorised. However it was not until 1834 that the line from Dublin to Kingstown was built.

The company which would build the railway was founded in 1831. Following the passing of the necessary parliamentary act, the contract to build the railway line was awarded to William Dargan. William Dargan was born near Carlow town, Ireland on February 28th 1799. In his early career he built roads in England and Ireland most notably the road from Dublin to Howth. Following the successful completion of the first railway line in Ireland, Dargan went on to build over 1,300km of Ireland’s railways. He is often referred to as the father of the Irish rail network. He was also responsible for a host of other infrastructure projects around Ireland and he funded the Great Industrial Exhibition in Dublin in 1853.

Construction on the new railway line began on April 11th 1833. Several engineering difficulties and opposition from some landowners along the route had to be overcome. Up to 1,800 people were employed when building was at its peak. It was built within the agreed budget and on time. The first journey was made by horse drawn coach, when one of the lines was complete in July 1834. The journey was made by directors of the company and their friends. Though the new service was resented by many, over 300,000 passengers used it in the first six months when it began service in 1834. Trains ran every half hour from 6am until midnight. It was later decided to extend the railway southwards. Isambard Brunel was appointed as consulting engineer for the line to Greystones. The railway line eventually reached Wexford in 1872.

The first railway train in Ireland which consisted of eight carriages hauled by a steam locomotive (Hibernia) ‘filled with ladies and gentlemen’ travelled from Dublin to Kingstown (Dún Laoghaire) in the year 1834 On This Day.

Steam Train – The Kingstown Special by infomatique on 2009-08-02 17:13:39

Dun Laoighre Railway Station photo

Pearse Station (Westland Row) Dublin

Photo by sporras

 

15 June-Bishop James Doyle (JKL), Carlow

In the Cathedral of the Assumption in Carlow, Ireland there stands a monument to Bishop James Doyle (JKL, James Kildare and Leighlin). The monument to Bishop Doyle by John Hogan shows Dr Doyle standing beside a kneeling allegorical figure of Ireland with her arm resting on a harp. Dr Doyle served as Roman Catholic bishop of the diocese of Kildare and Leighlin from 1819 to 1834. He was a leading campaigner on issues such as Emancipation, Education Reform, the payment of Tithes and Poor-Relief. He was responsible for the building of the Cathedral of the Assumption in Carlow.

James Warren Doyle was born close to the town of New Ross in County Wexford in 1786. He was educated locally and later at the Augustinian College in New Ross. In 1806 he moved to Portugal to study at the University of Coimbra. However his studies were interrupted by the Peninsular Campaign of the Napoleonic Wars. Doyle joined the British army, served as a sentry at Coimbra and later accompanied the Duke of Wellington to Lisbon as an interpreter.

James Doyle returned to Ireland and was ordained at Enniscorthy on October 1st 1809. Four years later he was appointed Professor of Rhetoric at Carlow College and in 1814 he was appointed Professor of Theology. Following the death of Dr Michael Corcoran, Bishop of Kildare and Leighlin Dr Doyle, in 1819 at the age of 32, was chosen as his successor.

During his time as bishop Dr Doyle became known in Ireland and Britain for his efforts to promote equality for people of the Catholic faith. He supported Daniel O’Connell and the Catholic Association. Catholic Emancipation was passed by the Government led by the Duke of Wellington in 1928. He played an active role in the suppression of the hedge schools and helped establish the National School system in 1831. The school system was established ahead of what was then available in Britain. On three occasions, 1825, 1830 and 1832 he was invited to London to address parliamentary enquiries about Ireland.

Bishop Doyle laid the foundation stone for Carlow Cathedral in June 1828. The cathedral was completed and dedicated on December 1st 1833. He died of tuberculosis in 1834 and was buried in the newly built cathedral.

Dr James Doyle who served as Roman Catholic Bishop of the diocese of Kildare and Leighlin (JKL, James Kildare and Leighlin) for 15 years died at the age of 48 in the year 1834 On This Day.

Carlow Cathedral by Nico Kaiser on 2012-10-21 11:44:05